How Much Protein You Need To Build Muscle

Are you trying to pack on as much muscle as possible? Then you’re going to have to understand protein if you want to gain the best results possible from those long hours spent at the gym. But how much protein do you actually need for muscle?

You may have heard many answers, which is why you are here reading this article. We collected the most up-to-date information backed up by science to help you determine the proper protein intake for you and your fitness goals!

Let’s dive right in!

Understanding ‘’Grams Of Protein’’

Understanding the difference between protein grams and food-containing protein is not only important for your diet but also to make sense of various studies. For example, an 8 ounce serving of beef may contain few grams compared to a large egg that has more than 6 grams in it.

In nutrition science, “grams of protein” refers to the number of grams a macronutrient (protein) and not the amount found in meat or eggs. For example, an 8-ounce serving of beef weighs 226 grams but only contains 61 grams while a large egg weighs 46 grams with 6 grams.

How Much Protein Do You Need to Gain Muscle?

Protein powder and shake on the table

In order to build muscle, you need protein. Many bodybuilders and athletes will say to intake one gram of protein per every pound of body weight. However, if it was this easy, then we would already have the answer.

So how much protein do you need to build muscle effectively?  That depends on a variety of factors like your current body composition and level of fitness among other things such as age or if you are also trying to lose weight (or maintain it). 

For example, someone with more lean mass needs more protein than somebody who has excess fat tissue at the same height/weight ratio because they have less muscle for their size by comparison. This makes sense too – remember when we were kids our parents would tell us that eating veggies were good for us so now those vegetables will help fill in some gaps where calories might be lacking from dieting! 

Both bodybuilders and weightlifters often require higher amounts due to increased levels of activity, which is probably where one gram (or more) per pound of body weight came from.

One important factor to consider when building muscle is not only the amount of protein that you are ingesting but also your other macronutrient intake. Timing and quantity can make or break a fitness routine, so get in touch with one of our coaches for personalized advice on how much protein will be best suited for you!

Protein consumption has been considered by many as an essential part of achieving goals set out during weight training routines; however, it’s vital to understand what type and timing work best for each individual based on their age, level of activity, body composition.

To better help you determine how much protein you need, you can use this calculator to get a better understanding of what intake you need according to your needs.

Muscle Protein Synthesis (MPS) vs. Muscle Protein Breakdown (MPB)

Muscle protein synthesis (MPS) is the process of repairing and maintaining muscles after intense use. When you exercise or do strenuous activity, it creates micro-tears in your muscle tissue that leads to a breakdown of proteins called “muscle protein breakdown.” Amino acids are then shuttled to your muscles from amino acid reserves like blood plasma for MPS.

Protein is a vital element for those who are interested in building muscle and maintaining lean body mass. However, MPS (Massive Protein Synthesis) is not the only key to success; when working out one must also take into consideration how their training will affect muscles during or after tearing them, as this process can increase strength or adapt to your needs.

What Science Is Saying About Protein and Muscle Growth

protein chemistry illustration

Some older studies suggest that an intake of at least 1.6 to 1.7 grams per kilogram is needed to maintain lean mass with strength training. More recent research suggests intakes as high as 2g/kg (~1g/lb) for most people are not beneficial and may lead to health issues such as cardiovascular disease or type II diabetes in some cases where energy consumption exceeds the recommended range from diet alone.

Recommendations:

The American Dietetic Association recommends 0.8-0.9 g protein per kg body weight every day which translates into about 56% more than what you might be eating now if consuming a low 2700 calorie plan because this number could mean up to 70%.

Your macro diet ratio may impact your body composition when looking at a surplus or restriction of calories. A narrative review and smaller studies have suggested that higher protein intakes between 2.2-3.4 grams (1-1.5 grams per pound) during large calorie surpluses promote lower gains in fat, promoting more muscle overall!

The macro ratios could be impacting how much fat you are gaining while on either a caloric surplus before the gym or trying to lose weight after an intense workout session – with these numbers being close approximations for what is recommended as well!

How Protein Supports Your Muscles

Protein is made up of amino acids that act as building blocks for your body’s cells and tissues, including muscle mass. Meaning, your muscles are born from protein. These amino acids are essential for supporting numerous bodily functions.

If you aren’t getting the required (essential) nutrients – like aminos – through food then eventually it may lead to a loss in muscle over time. This is primarily because they’re taking them away by either using what’s stored within our blood or tissue when we don’t get enough which can cause us not to have an opportunity for growth due to lack of nutritional resources!

Protein is made up of many different kinds of proteins among other substances such as water and fat molecules that make up living things called “proteins.” They are essential for recovery and repairing muscle tissue – post-workout.

How Much Protein Does The Average Person Need To Maintain Muscle Mass?

Bodybuilder posing and showing his muscles

If you’re at a healthy weight, don’t lift weights, and don’t exercise much, aiming for 0.36–0.6 grams per pound (0.8-1 g/kg) is the general recommendation as an estimate of your daily needs to maintain muscle mass in healthful living conditions such as ours; this amount ranges from 56-91g for men on average size or 46 to 75g women–depending on height and physical activity level respectively.

However given that there’s no evidence of harm and significant evidence if not outright overwhelming benefit, it would surely be better than most people err more toward consuming less protein rather than more!

The Verdict, How Much Protein?

Your macro diet for bulking ratio may impact your body composition when looking at a surplus or restriction of calories. A narrative review and smaller studies have suggested that higher protein intakes between 2.2-3.4 grams (1-1.5 grams per pound) during large calorie surpluses promote lower gains in fat while promoting more muscle.

Your macro diet ratios could be impacting how much fat you are gaining while on either a caloric surplus before the gym or trying to lose weight after an intense workout session – with these numbers being close approximations for what is recommended.